Non-Fiction Feminism goes to the Boston Women’s March for America

As we are sure you have noticed, NFF has a penchant for news. We, Charlotte and Kristen, both spend lots of time reading through many different news sites, often trying to get different perspectives on the same stories and events.

This week we are excited to announce that we’re taking our show on the road. Instead of just aggregating articles, we will be creating our own original content on the ground at the Boston Women’s March for America, which is one of many marches worldwide inspired by the Women’s March on Washington.

“On the day after the Inauguration, Americans will unite in towns, cities and schools from Boston to Anchorage to send a message to our leaders and the world that the United States of America stands for values of human dignity, equal rights and freedom from discrimination,” Boston organizers told us.

The 2016 election was widely considered one of the most divisive elections in recent history. People are scared by what may come under a Trump presidency and others are hopeful that he will drastically change the way things have been for the past 8 years under the Obama presidency. Despite the deeply drawn party lines, the march is a celebration and a way to stand for the diversity of the American people and a way to acknowledge and respect differences.

“While some organizers and participants are energized by the election results, this March is a symbol of solidarity with communities most affected by the hate, intolerance and acts of violence being perpetrated throughout the nation—among many are communities of women, immigrants, people of color, people who identify as LGBTQIA and people with disabilities,” organizers said.

Those who march stand for religious freedom, human rights, climate justice, racial justice, economic justice and reproductive justice. Together, they hope to send a message to our leaders and the world, that the United States of America stands for values of human decency, equal rights and freedom from discrimination. It is a peaceful, nonpartisan march.

When asked how to involve men in a march primarily focused on women, the Boston organizers told us that “Everyone is welcome to attend our march! While women are leading the march, men and children are welcome and encouraged to attend.” There have been many articles and interviews discussing men’s lack of involvement in these marches, but if the aim is expressing solidarity, we hope the men of Boston join in.

Organizers said in a press release that more than 40,000 women, men and children have committed to marching with U.S. Senator Elizabeth Warren, Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey and Boston Mayor Martin J. Walsh. The Boston Women’s March for America is one of over 300 happening nationwide and internationally inspired by the Women’s March on Washington.

As reporters of history in the making, we want to know what is motivating such great numbers to come out and march. As is part of our own mission at NFF, we hope to encourage everyone to listen with respect to the many different perspectives that people have on these seemingly divisive issues. Check back in with us in the days following the march to see what we found. Maybe we will even see you out marching in Boston too!

 
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